Refugia retreats began in August 2016. It is a collaborative effort combining environmental concerns, spirituality, and self-discovery.

 WHY REFUGIA?

Refugia is a scientific term referring to places that become safe spaces for organisms and life to endure in the midst of upheaval. Author and professor, Kathleen Dean Moore, in her book, Great Tide Rising, describes it like this:

"What the scientists know now, but didn’t understand then, is that when the mountain blasted ash and rock across the landscape, the devastation never touched some small places hidden in the lee of rocks and trees. Here, a bed of moss and deer-fern under a rotting log. There, under a boulder, a patch of pearly everlasting and the tunnel to a vole’s musty nest. Between stones in a buried stream, a slick of algae and clustered dragonfly eggs. “Refugia,” they call them: small places of safety where life endures. From the micro-environments of the refugia, mice and toads emerged blinking onto the blasted plain. Grasses spread, strawberries sent out runners. From a thousand, ten thousand, maybe countless small places of enduring life, meadows returned to the mountain. "                                                     
At Refugia Retreats we are committed to creating safe spaces that foster life. Spaces where individuals are invited into deeper self-discovery, where ideas are fostered and nourished, and where communities are invited to re-envision the world around them.

Who is REFUGIa?

Jodi Lammiman is a lover of life, beauty, art, stimulating conversation and wilderness spaces. With a formal education in Sacred Literature, Leadership and Spiritual Direction, Jodi became interested in the intersections between social and environmental justice, spirituality and the human psyche. She lived and worked in an intentional retreat community for four years where she was immersed in the practices of hospitality, active listening and contemplative living. She is a spiritual director, retreats facilitator, and an avid reader.

Jodi Lammiman is a lover of life, beauty, art, stimulating conversation and wilderness spaces. With a formal education in Sacred Literature, Leadership and Spiritual Direction, Jodi became interested in the intersections between social and environmental justice, spirituality and the human psyche. She lived and worked in an intentional retreat community for four years where she was immersed in the practices of hospitality, active listening and contemplative living. She is a spiritual director, retreats facilitator, and an avid reader.

Amy Spark loves interacting with the natural world through movement: by bicycle, hiking boots, or snowshoes.  Interested in the intersection between ecological and mental health, Amy has developed youth retreats on food justice, and recently completed her MSc on the concept of ecological grief.  Now, she is an environmental program coordinator by day, amateur homesteader by night, and lover of all things X-files.  

Amy Spark loves interacting with the natural world through movement: by bicycle, hiking boots, or snowshoes.  Interested in the intersection between ecological and mental health, Amy has developed youth retreats on food justice, and recently completed her MSc on the concept of ecological grief.  Now, she is an environmental program coordinator by day, amateur homesteader by night, and lover of all things X-files.